Kansas City Top Graphic
Kansas City Premier Apartments Article Header
Link Trail: Terms & Conditions

Equal Opportunity Housing is Everyone's Right - Kansas City Equal Housing Protection and Guidelines.

Discrimination in all advertising for rental and sale of properties is illegal as stated in section 3604 (c) of the Federal Fair Housing Act. This section specifically states that discrimination in the sale or rental of housing and other prohibited practices, it is unlawful to make, print, or publish, or cause to be made, printed, or published any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.

The Fair Housing Act and the other federal laws prohibit discrimination and the intimidation of people in their homes, apartment buildings, and condominium developments - and nearly all housing transactions, including the rental and sale of housing and the provision of mortgage loans.

Equal access to rental housing and homeownership opportunities is the cornerstone of this nation’s federal housing policy. Landlords who refuse to rent or sell homes to people based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, or disability are violating federal law, and HUD will vigorously pursue them.

Housing discrimination is not only illegal; it contradicts in every way the principles of freedom and opportunity we treasure as Americans. The Department of Housing and Urban Development is committed to ensuring that everyone is treated equally when searching for a place to call home.

The Fair Housing Act provides additional protections, and limited exceptions, that are explained in publications from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development ("HUD") and the Department of Justice.

HUD has issued guidance on advertising, including for roommates.
State and local laws often prohibit discrimination based on other factors (e.g. sexual orientation, age, marital status, or source of income).
You may report housing discrimination to HUD at 1-800-669-9777, or to a fair housing advocate near you.

The Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination in housing because of:

  • Race or color
  • National origin
  • Religion
  • Gender
  • Familial status (including children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18)
  • Disability - The Fair Housing Act covers most housing. In some circumstances, the Act exempts owner-occupied buildings with no more than four units, single-family housing sold or rented without the use of a broker and housing operated by organizations and private clubs that limit occupancy to members.

In the Sale and Rental of Housing: No one may take any of the following actions based on race, color, religion, gender, disability, familial status, or national origin:

  • Refuse to rent or sell housing
  • Refuse to negotiate for housing
  • Make housing unavailable
  • Deny a dwelling
  • Set different terms, conditions or privileges for sale or rental of a dwelling
  • Provide different housing services or facilities
  • Falsely deny that housing is available for inspection, sale or rental
  • For profit, persuade, or try to persuade homeowners to sell or rent dwellings by suggesting that people of a particular race, etc. have moved, or are about to move into the neighborhood (blockbusting) or
  • Deny any person access to, or membership or participation in, any organization, facility or service related to the sale or rental of dwellings, or discriminate against any person in the terms or conditions of such access, membership or participation.

The Fair Housing Act; What Housing Is Covered? What Is Prohibited?

It is a violation of the Fair Housing Act to:

  • Threaten, coerce, intimidate or interfere with anyone exercising a fair housing right or assisting others who exercise that right.
  • Make, print, or publish any statement, in connection with the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates a preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, gender, disability, familial status, or national origin. This prohibition against discriminatory advertising applies to single-family and owner-occupied housing that is otherwise exempt from the Fair Housing Act.
  • Refuse to provide homeowners insurance coverage for a dwelling because of the race, color, religion, gender, disability, familial status, or national origin of the owner and/or occupants of a dwelling.
  • Discriminate in the terms or conditions of homeowner’s insurance coverage because of the race, color, religion, gender, disability, familial status, or national origin of the owner and/or occupants of a dwelling.
  • Refuse to provide homeowner’s insurance, or imposing less favorable terms or conditions of coverage because of the predominant race, color, religion, gender, disability, familial status or national origin of the residents of the neighbor¬hood in which a dwelling is located ("redlining").
  • Refuse to provide available information on the full range of home owner’s insurance coverage options available because of the race, etc. of the owner and/or occupants of a dwelling.
  • Make, print, or publish any statement, in connection with the provision of home owner’s insurance coverage that indicates a preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, gender, disability, familial status or national origin

If you or someone associated with you:

  • Have a physical or mental disability (including hearing, mobility and visual impairments, cancer, chronic mental illness, AIDS, AIDS Related Complex, or mental retardation) that substantially limits one or more major life activities.
  • Have a record of such a disability or
  • Are regarded as having such a disability, your landlord may not:
  • Refuse to let you make reasonable modifications to your dwelling or common use areas, at your expense, if necessary for the disabled person to fully use the housing. (Where reasonable, the landlord may permit changes only if you agree to restore the property to its original condition when you move.)
  • Refuse to make reasonable accommodations in rules, policies, practices or services if necessary for the disabled person to use the housing on an equal basis with nondisabled persons. Example: A building with a “no pets” policy must allow a visually impaired tenant to keep a guide dog.
  • Example: An apartment complex that offers tenants ample, unassigned parking must honor a request from a mobility-impaired tenant for a reserved space near her apartment if necessary to assure that she can have access to her apartment.
  • However, housing need not be made available to a person who is a direct threat to the health or safety of others or who currently uses illegal drugs.

Additional Protection If You Have a Disability

Accessibility Requirements for New Multifamily Buildings: In buildings with four or more units that were first occupied after March 13, 1991, and that have an elevator:

  • Public and common areas must be accessible to persons with disabilities
  • Doors and hallways must be wide enoughfor wheelchairs
All units must have:
  • An accessible route into and through the unit
  • Accessible light switches, electrical outlets, thermostats and other environmental controls
  • Reinforced bathroom walls to allow later installation of grab bars and
  • Kitchens and bathrooms that can be used by people in wheelchairs.
If a building with four or more units has no elevator and was first occupied after March 13, 1991, these standards apply to ground floor units only.
These accessibility requirements for new multifamily buildings do not replace more stringent accessibility standards required under State or local law.

The Fair Housing Act makes it unlawful to discriminate against a person whose household includes one or more children who are under 18 years of age ("familial status"). Familial status protection covers households in which one or more minor children live with:

  • A parent;
  • A person who has legal custody (including guardianship) of a minor child or children; or
  • The designee of a parent or legal custodian, with the written permission of the parent or legal custodian.
Familial status protection also extends to pregnant women and any person in the process of securing legal custody of a minor child (including adoptive or foster parents).

Additional familial status protections: You also may be covered under the familial status provisions of the Fair Housing Act if you experience retaliation, or suffer a financial loss (employment, housing, or realtor’s commission) because:

  • You sold or rented, or offered to sell or rent a dwelling to a family with minor children; or
  • You negotiated, or attempted to negotiate the sale or rental of a dwelling to a family with minor children.

The "Housing for Older Persons" Exemption: The Fair Housing Act specifically exempts some senior housing facilities and communities from liability for familial status discrimination. Exempt senior housing facilities or communities can law¬fully refuse to sell or rent dwellings to families with minor children, or may impose different terms and conditions of residency. In order to qualify for the "housing for older persons" exemption, a facility or community must prove that its housing is:

  • Provided under any State or Federal program that HUD has determined to be specifically designed and operated to assist elderly persons (as defined in the State or Federal program); or
Housing Opportunities for Families with Children
  • Intended for, and solely occupied by persons 62 years of age or older; or
  • Intended and operated for occupancy by persons 55 years of age or older.
  • In order to qualify for the "55 or older" housing exemption, a facility or community must satisfy each of the following requirements:
    • at least 80 percent of the occupied units must have at least one occupant who is 55 years of age or older; and
    • the facility or community must publish and adhere to policies and procedures that demonstrate the intent to operate as "55 or older" housing; and
    • the facility or community must comply with HUD’s regulatory requirements for age verification of residents by reliable surveys and affidavits.
    The "housing for older persons" exemption does not protect senior housing facilities or communities from liability for housing discrimination based on race, color, religion, gender, disability, or national origin. Further, "55 or older" housing facilities or communities that do permit residency by families with minor children cannot lawfully segregate such families in a particular section, building, or portion of a building. HUD is ready to help with any problem of housing discrimination. If you think your rights have been violated, you may write a letter or telephone the HUD office nearest you. You have one year after the discrimination allegedly occurred or ended to file a complaint with HUD, but you should file it as soon as possible.

    What are the laws for roommates and shared housing?
    Federal Fair Housing laws for roommates and shared housing have two components: advertising and decision-making.

    • Advertising: Federal Fair Housing laws prohibit discriminatory advertising in all housing, regardless of how large or small the property. However, advertising which expresses a preference based upon sex is allowed in shared living situations where tenants will share a bathroom, kitchen, or other common area.
    • Decision-making: Although the prohibition on discriminatory advertising applies to roommate and shared housing situations, federal Fair Housing laws do not cover the basis of decisions made by landowners who own less than four units, and live in one of the units. This means that in a situation in which a landlord owns less than four rental units, and lives in one of the units, it is legal for the owner to discriminate in the selection process based on the aforementioned categories, but it is illegal for that owner to advertise or otherwise make a statement expressing that discriminatory preference.

    Exceptions to advertising laws Under federal Fair Housing law, the prohibition on discriminatory advertisements applies to all situations except the following:

    • Shared Housing Exemption -- If you are advertising a shared housing unit, in which tenants will be sharing a bathroom, kitchen, or other common area, you may express a preference based upon sex only.
    • Private Club and Religious Exemptions -- A religious community or private club whose membership is not restricted based upon race, color, or national origin may restrict tenancy only to its members in a property that it owns, and may advertise to that effect.
    • Housing for Older Persons Exemption -- Certain complexes for elderly persons are exempt from prohibitions on familial status discrimination, including the prohibitions on discriminatory advertising.

    If You Think Your Rights Have Been Violated What to Tell HUD:

    • Your name and address
    • The name and address of the person your complaint is against (the respondent)
    • The address or other identification of thehousing involved
    • A short description of the alleged violation(the event that caused you to believe your rights were violated)
    • The date(s) of the alleged violation.
    Where to Write or Call: Send a letter to the HUD office nearest you, or if you wish, you may call that office directly. The TTY numbers listed for those offices are not toll free. Or you may call the toll free national TTY hotline at 1-800-927-9275.

    KANSAS CITY REGIONAL OFFICE
    (Complaints_office_07@hud.gov)
    U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
    Gateway Tower II,
    400 State Avenue, Room 200, 4th Floor
    Kansas City, KS 66101-2406
    Telephone (913) 551-6958 or 1-800-743-5323
    Fax (913) 551-6856 * TTY (913) 551-6972

    Fair Housing booklet

    by Tiffany Lewis, Kansas City Premier Apartments, Inc.

    Copyright 2001-2016 Kansas City Premier Apartments, Inc.
    Disclaimer: KCPA is an advertising service and assumes no responsibility for errors and omissions nor for the properties represented.
    * Citizens of Missouri and persons moving to the State of Missouri are not elligible to participate in the KCPA $100 Reward Program.
    Privacy Policy | License Agreement | Credits | Awards | Mobile
    Equal Housing Opportunity.